Acadia

An Intro, Explanation, and Coda.

It is absolutely obvious, and painfully clear that the September debut of the freshmen album, Acadia did not happen. As with any project, circumstances over the course of 8 months change drastically; drastically altering the progress of such an already slow burning project. Before I delve any further into the complexities of why the album has yet to be released, let us reflect on the past events which critically crippled its progress.

In the winter of 2011, I was struggling. I was at what has so far been the top of my personal musical expertise, and more than able to understand by that point in time, that a personal album project would be eminent. This idea was sparked by the moving of my absolute closest friend and only confidant in the world at the time: A musician, who like myself was at the top of his game at a very young age. We learned how to play together, and most of all, we learned how to play virtuosically together. Once I understood that this move would undoubtably tear us apart (which it among other things did), I felt my internal clock of creation begin to tick. I only had months left with him truly, and therefore began to write the beginnings of the Acadia album. Of course at the time it was named The Bitter Cold, and our musical project The Northern Arcade, yet the musical principle of what we were doing then, and what I still do today were all the same. I put me and him out in front musically of the album, making it instrumental in order to accent his virtuosic bass skills, as well as my own personal abilities on guitar.

Recording sessions went well all through the summer of 2011, ending in August of that year. We parted ways, and I was left with a mass of material, none of which was finished to continue working on until he would be able to continue another session at his small home studio at another time. Except this never happened. Due to complex legal issues between me and an affiliation with which he is a large part of, we never were able to continue our friendship, much less an entire musical project like Acadia. Crushed and depraved of the only musical inspiration I personally had at the time, I left the project. I let it collect dust in the corner of both closets and computers for nearly a year, no longer caring what became of my only sonic legacy. It was with the introduction of another great musician that I truly began to musically explore again. Christopher Scott was a man I knew much and yet at the same time nothing about. I knew he was from Durham, North Carolina, and was well known in the local music community, but my knowledgeability at the time extended no further. It was not until I was invited to play under his instruction that I began to understand his genius. Christopher is not a virtuoso, nor is he a musical maverick, however he is an incredible leader both musically and spiritually, subconsciously making me play to the best of my abilities at the time of our first show together.

While our friendship began to blossom, I was beginning to write music for the first time in nearly two years. After failed attempts to revitalize my old album now dubbed Acadia, I realized I could not do this alone. Christopher had somehow ignited in me the ideas that I had buried and forgotten, giving me a fresh and new canvas in order to paint my only sonic masterpiece onto. The theme of the album became dark, yet revealing; The Libretto about a man finding himself through the dreariness of his meaningless life. Perhaps this was me. Me reawakening my soul after the crushing blow of losing not only my closest friend, but the death of several others, the front row view of my parents’ sicknesses, and the crawling away of almost everyone who had anything to do with me. However, this blog is meant to remain in the frame of musical ideas, not personal to an extent.

The demos were recorded late at night, by myself. Every guitar track, every bass and drum track, everything was all of my own doing. After nearly a year of careful writing, I came to Christopher, as my musical partner to help record the new project. Old ideas were scrapped, and the Acadia album has come alive again. Being that I want this piece of music to be as masterful as personally possible, it will take quite some time to record it in full. Once a week, me and Christopher sit down together and rework parts of each song, one song a session, in order to make it a beautiful, lush, and seamless as possible. Once all ten tracks are covered, we will then begin to record in the same way that we edited the album together.

Perhaps this is self-induced therapy, or perhaps this is the manic ravings of a mad musician, but at whatever rate you view this particular blog post at, you the reader will now know why it is imperative to me to finish what I started going on 3 years ago now, and that this mere hour long piece of music was intended to be the swan song of my old beloved life as a young man. Take care, and have a blessed Christmas season.

• Jonathan Morgan Price